Lino!

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I use lino in most of my work, but there are different  processes within lino printing.  Here's a quick explanation of the ways I use lino...

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Single block...just carve away the whites, ink the block and take a print!

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Reduction

One piece of lino, multiple passes...no return!

The reduction method is a process of making multicoloured lino prints using just one piece of lino.  As with a single-block, single-pass, you carve away the parts that you don't want to print. Then repeat the process; carving away the parts you want to remain the first colour you printed and printing a second colour...repeat as necessary! Personally I rarely to more than 4 passes, but many artists do more!

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Multi-block

Carve a key block then transfer it to further blocks to carve the other elements independently. 

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Jigsaw method

Pieces of lino are fitted together like a jigsaw.  This makes fiddly shapes easier to ink up more precisely.

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Chine colle

Smaller pieces of coloured paper are collaged during the printing process.

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Blended roll

Also known as a rainbow roll, this is where different colours are inked up on the same pass, often on the same roller.